Teresa Bridges | Hobe Sound Real Estate, Palm Beach Gardens Real Estate, Palm City Real Estate


As a home seller, it is important to note that you're not alone in the real estate market. In fact, dozens of other nearby home sellers likely are doing everything they can to promote their residences to prospective homebuyers. This means that you may need to think outside the box to generate interest in your home. Fortunately, every homebuyer is looking for a bargain, and home sellers who offer incentives may be able to sweeten the deal if a homebuyer is interested in purchasing a residence. Incentives are readily available that you can offer to homebuyers, and some of the top incentives to consider include: 1. Covering the Closing Costs. Closing costs can add up quickly for homebuyers and may be a deterrent for a buyer to purchase a particular residence. However, you can eliminate this deterrent if you agree to cover even a portion of a homebuyer's closing costs. Agreeing to cover a homebuyer's closing costs up to a predetermined amount may help you seal the deal with a prospective buyer. And ultimately, this incentive could make it easier for you to reap the benefits of a quick sale. 2. Allocate a Set Amount for Home Upgrades. After a homebuyer conducts a property inspection, he or she may ask for upgrades to a residence's furnace, windows or other areas. These issues may be deal-breakers, unless you allocate a set amount to account for potential home upgrades. Completing these upgrades on your own may prove to be both time-consuming and costly. On the other hand, setting aside a set amount for upgrades and agreeing to deduct this amount from the total cost of your home could serve as a distinct incentive for homebuyers. Ultimately, you'll want to do as much as possible to ensure that a homebuyer remains interested in your home after an inspection is completed. And by determining a particular amount to deduct from your home's price and sticking to it following an inspection, you'll be better equipped to satisfy a homebuyer's home improvement demands. 3. Including the Appliances. You may have had your heart set on bringing your washer, dryer and refrigerator to your new home. Conversely, a homebuyer might want to avoid the hassle of installing new appliances if he or she buys your current residence. So what can you do? Including the appliances with your home may allow you to close the deal with a homebuyer. Remember, home appliances can be replaced, and you may be able to find new appliances that suit your future residence perfectly. And if a homebuyer wants the appliances in your home included in a deal, it may be worthwhile to offer this incentive to finalize an agreement. Selling a home can be tricky, and getting support from a real estate agent who understands the local market is essential. This real estate professional may help you brainstorm unique incentives that you can offer to homebuyers and speed up the home selling process. Consider the value of offering incentives to homebuyers, and you could boost your chances of a fast home sale.


This listing recently sold for $272,500.

671 Nw Broken Oak Trail, Jensen Beach, FL 34957  

$279,900
Price
$272,500
Sale Price
3
Bedrooms
2
Baths
Stunning, move-in-ready, 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car garage villa on golf course in Jensen Beach Country Club. Shows like a model home with tile throughout main living area, crown molding, custom window treatments, plantation shutters and granite counter tops. Highly desirable end unit lets in lots of light. Spacious floor plan with large screened lanai. All appliances are included. Outdoor patio furniture to remain with the home. Other furnishings may be negotiable. Low monthly HOA includes all exterior maintenance.


What does it take to generate interest in your home from the right homebuyers at the right time? Marketing is paramount, and using all of the marketing tools at your disposal will make it easier for any home seller to connect with prospective homebuyers consistently. Today, many high-quality marketing tools are readily available to home sellers, including: 1. Social Media Facebook and other social networks now empower home sellers to share details about their residences with homebuyers from around the world. Furthermore, social media is free and easy to use, making it a powerful tool to add to your home selling arsenal. Social media, of course, only ranks as an effective marketing tool if you understand how to leverage it properly. For instance, you'll want to include high-resolution photos of your home with any social media content. You also will want to respond to homebuyers' questions quickly as these queries are posted on social networks, as this may help your home stand out in a crowded real estate market. 2. Virtual Tours Imagine what it would be like if a homebuyer could take a walk through your home even if he or she were many miles away. Thanks to virtual tours, home sellers are able to offer homebuyers a distinct home showing experience, one that is sure to make a long-lasting impression. Before you set up a virtual tour, be sure to consult with a real estate agent. This professional will be able to help you stage your home properly and ensure it looks great to any prospective homebuyer during a virtual home showing. 3. Email Updates Work with your real estate agent to ensure your home is included in any email blasts that he or she sends out. By doing so, you'll be able to maximize your marketing reach and ensure that many homebuyers can learn about your residence immediately. Any email notification should include relevant information for recipients. Therefore, you should ensure that information about your home is included only in email blasts that go to homebuyers who are likely to be interested in your residence. For example, an email blast that is sent to luxury homebuyers should not include information about a tiny house that is now available, as this residence is unlikely to generate significant interest. On the other hand, highlighting your two-bedroom house in an email update sent to first-time homebuyers and small families may be ideal. By doing so, you may improve your home's chances of garnering substantial attention from homebuyers without delay. The home selling process continues to evolve, and thanks to best-in-class technologies, home sellers possess advanced tools they can use to showcase their residences at all times. Discover the benefits of first-rate technologies and be sure to use them as part of your home marketing efforts. With these tools, you'll be better equipped to accentuate the positives of your residence to homebuyers globally and boost your chances of obtaining multiple competitive offers for your house as well.

The most beautiful house could pose risks. A house that meets all of your space and decor wants could be structured so that it leaves your car and other vehicles exposed to external dangers. Proof of this has often revealed itself the night of a ravaging storm or the morning after.

Hard weather storms and certain house types may not mix

Many times during or after a hard storm, news reports share stories of how a vehicle was damaged while it was parked in a homeowner's driveway. It almost seems as if storm and damaged car or truck are somehow linked.

Although no house may be able to fully protect a vehicle from getting damaged when a hard weather storm hits, there may be some homes that are better at reducing a vehicle's exposure than other homes. Leading the way might be houses that don't come with a covered garage. Other types of houses or house conditions that may leave vehicles more exposed to damage during weather storms include:

  • Houses surrounded by large trees, particularly large, old trees - Damaged trees may appear to be healthy and strong which is why you might not get the trees inspected or cut the trees away. But, just because trees stand tall and look strong doesn't mean that trees aren't severely decayed. It's these very decayed trees that might fall on your car, truck or even your house should winds really pick up or hail plummet the ground.
  • Houses with loose roof shingles - It's not hard to see how loose roof shingles could slip off the top of a house and slam onto a car, potentially shattering car windows.
  • Loose house awnings - Similar to loose roof shingles, if a house's awnings are loose, they could shake away from the house during a hard storm. Once awnings separate from a house, they could start slapping the top or side of a vehicle.Worse, awnings or pieces of an awning could swing across your property and damage a neighbor's car or truck.
  • Houses built near falling rocks - There's almost nothing that can be done to completely stop falling rocks from breaking loose and damaging nearby property.
  • Houses that are located on steep hills or sharp inclines - These are times when your vehicle could slide down a hill and crash into another vehicle. That or your car or truck could slide down an incline and crash into a ditch.

Protecting the belongings that are inside your home isn't the only goal that you should have when you buy a house. You also want to buy a house that offers protections for your vehicles. You want a house that reduces the likelihood that your car,truck or motorcycle will suffer damage during a hard storm. Although there maybe no house that can offer full protection for your vehicles, there are things you can look for in a house that don't invite damage.


Most potential buyers for your home will have their first impression on the internet in the form of a photo gallery of your home. Therefore it’s essential to have quality photos that show off the size and features of both the interior and exterior of your house.

As smartphones are equipped with ever-improving built in cameras, taking decent photos of your home has never been easier. However, there are still a few basic photography techniques that you should keep in mind to get the best results.

In this article, we’ll give you some tips on shooting professional-looking photos of your home that will leave a good impression on potential buyers.

Lighting matters most

It may seem like most cameras these days adjust the exposure for poor lighting pretty well. However, if you’re taking photos in a dimly lit house, you can’t depend on your camera to fix the problem. When your camera or smartphone automatically adjusts the brightness of a photo you’re really losing photo quality.

You might have noticed pictures that appear grainy or pixelized. That is often because the photographer didn’t have enough light and allowed the camera to adjust. For best results, take photos in your home when the sun is high, open up the blinds and curtains, and turn on some ambient light in the room. A well-lit home looks much more inviting in photos than a dark one.

There’s only one other lighting tip you’ll need for taking quality photos of your home, and that’s to never use flash. Phone camera flashes can be good in a pinch if you’re not concerned with how a photo is going to look. But, it if you’re trying to take nice photos of your home a smart phone flash will likely ruin your photos. It will create a glare on any number if surfaces in your home and it will create an unnatural white-colored light that is typically unflattering.

Where you stand is important

You want to show off all of the features of your home, but you don’t want to have hundreds of photos in your gallery. To achieve this, it’s best to stand in a corner or against a wall to fit as much as possible into the frame.

Avoid holding the camera up over your head or kneeling down. Typically, when we see a home we see it from eye-level. Photos that are taken from a perspective that is unnaturally high up or low to the ground will appear strange and foreign to someone who is unfamiliar with your home.

Take a ton of photos

One of the most common pieces of advice amateur photographers receive is to shoot as many photos as they can. This helps you for two reasons. First, the more photos you take the more likely it is that there will be a few great shots. Second, shooting a lot of photos and then reviewing your work is the best way to learn what looks good and what doesn’t.

In a time where digital memory is cheap, there’s no reason to be economical with the number of photos you take.




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